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Clinical track

  • A.c.hoppenbrouwers@gmail.com schreef:

    Thank you! How about the difference between those with and those without stress/psychiatric problems?

    • E. van der Valk (Rotterdam) schreef:

      THanks for your question! A previous colleague reported a significant association between HairF and depressive symptoms (IDS score) ( Gerritsen & Staufenbiel et al, 2018). Not all other large cohorts can repeat this however.

    • E. van der Valk (Rotterdam) schreef:

      This is a nice systematic review on the relation between depressive symptoms and hair glucocorticoids https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149763419309443

      • A.c.hoppenbrouwers@gmail.com schreef:

        Thank you. I can not read the complete article from home but saved it to look it up at work.
        Of course I still wonder if the effect om BMI/WC (glucose) is caused by the higher cortisol. That is difficult to investigate, I think. But my theory would be that there is common cause and that common cause could be depression. So I wonder if your group of people without depression show the same results as the total group

        • E. van der Valk (Rotterdam) schreef:

          Yes, I agree. It is of course not yet clear that the relation cortisol/BMI/WC is causal. However, the cross-sectional relation between long-term cortisol and depression is much more inconsistent than cortisol/BMI ( which is now quite well established). Moreover, our results can be a first indication for causality as we demonstrate that cortisol is actually predictive for weight gain/WC change ( which was not the case for depressive symptoms).
          Also, the groups with depression and without depression did not differ so much, if there was any relation it was for cortisol – depressive symptoms on a continuous scale.
          However, indeed it is going to be challenging to prove true causality ( but this is something we are working on for the future!:) )

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